Dadunzi

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A Neolithic site in Pei Xian, Jiangsu province, China, with three main levels named after the nearby sites of Qinlian'gang, Liulin, and Huating. The lowest (Qinglian'gang) level at Danunzi yielded a radiocarbon date of c 4500 BC. In the middle (Liulin) level, extraordinary painted pottery was found with the usual undecorated pots native to the local Qinglian'gang tradition. Both the shapes and the painted designs copy the Yangshao pottery of Miaodigou; radiocarbon dates suggest that the Liulin phase belongs in the 4th millennium BC. Some graves of the Liulin phase at Dadunzi contained sacrificed dogs. At Dawenkou in Shangdong, where the lower level belongs to the Huating phase, pigs appear instead, and the graves often take the form of a stepped pit - significant as forerunners of characteristic Shang burial practices. Perforated tortoise shells from Liulin graves may likewise foreshadow tortoise plastrons in Shang oracle bones.

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Neolithic site in Pei Yangshao levels range from c3700 to ¿3050 Xian, northern Jiangsu province, China, with bc. The uppermost Yangshao level represents three main levels named after the nearby sites a late stage of the Miaodigou I culture, known also from Guangwu Qinwangzhai and seen here at the eastern limit of its distribution. In this level at Dahe the expected painted pottery is found alongside unpainted pots, including ding and dou shapes, that recall the Huating-Dawenkou phase of the east-coast Qinglian’GANg culture. Apparently intrusive at Dahe, this pottery may represent the beginnings of a westward movement of east-coast influences that eventually transformed the Yangshao tradition, in Henan giving rise to the Hougang II culture (see Longshan).

The Macmillan dictionary of archaeology, Ruth D. Whitehouse, 1983Copied

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